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Joined: Jan 06 2018
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English is a Germanic language so you're already half way there.

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If iremember correctly English was based on old German and most of the North Alantic and Baltic countrys spoke it. Then again I am trying to remember things I read 60 years ago so take that with a grain of salt.

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You're right. It's old High German with Old Viking Norse laid on top. Then the Saxons got involved and brought it to Briton where it picked up some Pict. And Gaelic. After that, you get Spanish, Italian, Latin, French, Portugese and yet other actual Romance languages layered on top of all that mess. Now export to Australia, Africa, and both American continents and rinse and repeat. There's a reason English is so difficult....

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So why would you need to learn German to use Knoppix?
It runs in English by default.

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What I downloaded was in German could not find it in Englisjh. I really don't give a damn about knoppix, but I have been saying for a couple of years now that I should learn German. At least to be able to read it.

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Maybe have a look at Duolingo, they offer some basic language courses for free.
https://www.duolingo.com/course/de/en/Learn-German-Online

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nubimax wrote:

... I should learn German. At least to be able to read it.

If you have a bit of a hang for languages, that shouldn't be too hard. The good thing about German is that the rules apply a real lot more regularly than in English. Difficult is the gendering, as there is absolutely no logic behind it (best example: a young girl, "mädchen", has a neutral article), and perhaps that German has more words than English, around 30%, I believe.

I find the most difficult thing to be understanding the spoken word when talking to people who speak their local dialect.

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Interesting. I just tried to compare the number of words in English to German. the results for English are consistent with what I remember. About 170 -180 thousand. German gave wildly varying answers. An enormous range. 70 thousand - 9 million with most results falling about in the middle at 5 million.

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Yeah, I had a glance at the wiki articles about English and German to re-confirm what I remembered reading about the size of the respective vocabularies. The article about German suggests that "normal" words come to something over 300,000, but if you count in all the scientific words you are suddenly up around the 9 million or so.

What may be behind that, at leas in part, is the way words can be built in German. A noun and some adjectives can be stuck together to make a new word. F'rinstance: for want of a better example off the top of my head,
school

a school to learn to ride a horse
riding school

for a car
driving school

two words, both of which have other uses.

Schule (school)

a school to learn to ride a horse
Reitschule

for a car
Fahrschule

no gap in the middle, and a new word is born each time.

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One thing I find especially tiresome about German is paragraph structure. Under certain conditions, a paragraph can run to several thousand words. Translated to English, this is extremely long as English paragraphs are rarely more than a few hundred words at most. Often only a sentence or two. My superficial English thinking levels are overwhelmed by these huge German paragraphs that cover pages. It's why I find both brilliance and drudgery in Kafka's works.